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Episode 459: Remembering Tulsa and Rethinking Prayer


It’s been 100 years since the Tulsa Massacre—a dark moment in American history most Americans know nothing about. Which makes Phil, Skye, and Christian wonder, what else don’t we know? Wheaton College has removed the word “savages” from a plaque honoring martyred missionaries.

Was the move a result of political correctness or just common decency?


Then, Phil’s recent tweet about racism and anti-racism went viral, leading him to ask—when did evangelicals become more committed to preserving the world rather than changing it? Plus, the tables get turned when Skye gets interviewed by Kaitlyn about his newest book “What if Jesus was serious about prayer?” He explains why being a “radical” Christian isn’t what you think, and how prayer is way bigger than just talking to God. Plus, lonely Japanese eels are looking for attention on the internet.







14 Comments


Melody Foster
Melody Foster
Jun 07, 2021

For a while a lot of evangelicals were saying it would be WRONG to help people locally until we've helped all the worse off people internationally. In the late 90s & 2000s there was a fairly big push to stop thinking only in terms of America and think of the larger world. And I think the calls for greater cultural understanding and admonitions that even if we were poor Americans we were better off than 99% of the world evolved into - "Americans are fine, don't help them help Cambodia" or whoever.


There was such a big debate on the Relevant magazine discussion boards sometime between 2006-2010 that I actually asked my pastor if he thought it would be wrong…


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Caitlin McHale
Caitlin McHale
Jun 11, 2021
Replying to

That's interesting. I've more so heard the notion that Americans should help other Americans until there is no poverty, before helping internationally. I wonder what happened to that idea.

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I've been interested in history my entire life, my father was a history teacher and I've read a fair amount of history, and spent a lot of time watching the History Channel. I never heard of the Tulsa Massacre until a few weeks ago when they started talking about the 100th anniversary. I can't believe that something like that was never talked about.


On another topic, one of my former co-workers was in Wisconsin on vacation with his family, and ran into Richard Simmons shopping at the local Piggly Wiggly. They said he was very friendly, took the time to talk to them, and that he was just like he was on TV.

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Is what if jesus was serious about prayer the same book as what if jesus was serious, or is there a sequel already.

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Replying to

Nice. I may check one of them out. Keep up the good work.

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I don't want to be THAT guy, but I am going to keep saying this until you respond. I think you should have Ben Shapiro on the podcast because it would be funny and entertaining for Phil to be silly around him since he's always trying to be so tough and serious and angry, and it would also be cool for people who disagree to have a civil conversation. I'm not saying I want him to prove your other guests wrong, I just want you guys to have more people who aren't as moderate as you are, cause even people who lean a bit can be very thoughtful kind people.


thanks, David

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Replying to

Okay. Got it. I guess now I'll have to ask Ben Shapiro to invite you onto his show.


This is going to be a nightmare...

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Andy Young
Andy Young
Jun 03, 2021

I struggled for a long time with the tension between 'why pray?' and 'prayer is obviously important.' I searched the Bible and found that God only ever promises to give us ONE THING in response to prayer and promises it over and over again (Rom 8, 2 Cor 3, Jas 1&3, 1 Jn 4 & 5, Phil 4 & Gal 5, Jn 14, Luke 11 and more). For me, the tension resolved when I understood that God never promises to keep us from harm or give us health or wealth, but that HE will be with us whatever we go through. Prayer is accessing HIM; he is the promisor and the promise itself.

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