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428: How Should Christians Vote?


With less than a week until the election, Phil and Skye are joined by Kaitlyn Schiess to discuss what should, and should not, influence how Christians vote. First, they talk about reactions to Skye’s video (not Phil’s, he had nothing to do with it!) about abortion, and the different ways the issue is viewed by evangelicals. They also unpack recent articles about the election from three Christian leaders—John Piper, Al Mohler, and Joel Hunter.


It is just a coincidence that the two retired pastors oppose Trump? And why does Mohler hold Black Christians to a different standard when voting? Phil explains why two traditionally Republican counties should make conservatives rethink their support for Trump. And why is every election framed as an existential threat to America? Finally, Skye talks with Scott Arbeiter, president of World Relief, about the historically low number of refugees resettled in the U.S., the current administration’s broken promise to help persecuted Christians, and why evangelical leaders and laity are so far apart on the issue of immigration.




10 則留言


Michele Phoenix
Michele Phoenix
2020年11月10日

Perhaps something to dig into in a future episode? What is the Venn diagram between people who came to faith through fear tactics (choose heaven or you're doomed to hell) and those who apply the same rationale to their faith-informed political affiliation (choose "God's party" or you're doomed to hell)? In both cases, it's a binary, fear-fueled choice. All in or else--with little need for complex thinking or nuance. I wonder if it's possible that the initial impetus for one's spiritual conversion can predict one's motivation for choosing a "God-endorsed" party too--maybe even at the cost of moral and intellectual coherence?


Thank you, Phil and Skye, for lighting the way during this toxic pre-election season. As an American who spent…

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kevin perkins
kevin perkins
2020年11月04日

John Piper was no longer a pastor long before Trump was on the national political scene. Perhaps after seeing Trump in action for 3.5 years can someone say enough. Piper was not afraid a congregational backlash especially when he was not a pastor in Minnesota -hardly a place where Trump is loved anyways


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I'm a White, College Educated, Suburban, Registered Republican Woman. I'm also a Never Trumper. I feel like the Church has let America down by tying itself so closely to ONE political party. Human rights, social safety net (caring for orphans and widows), education, and a stable secure infrastructure should be Christian values. How we get there - we can disagree on. But when ONE party says it is THE WAY to American, we've lost our way. In my opinion, the Republican Party has moved so far away from Christian Values to valuing SELF and MONEY above everything. I WANT affordable housing in my neighborhood. I WANT a culturally and ethnically diverse school system. I WANT people who don't look lik…


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Kevin LaForge
Kevin LaForge
2020年11月03日

“Vote on behalf of the least of these”


Nope. Government is violent force. It is and always will be a poor substitute for the work Christians should be doing themselves.


“Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. They may be more likely to go to Heaven yet at the same time likelier to make a…

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Listened to the first half or so of the podcast this morning. I think you guys are being very uncharitable to Mohler's take on how and why black Christians vote Democratic. No, he doesn't list out the reasons why this happens (which you guys take to be kinda sorta racist), but neither does he list out the reasons white evangelicals have voted Republican (is he kinda sorta racist for that, too?). He merely observes the fact and then plainly states he is making his case for voting for Trump and that they have every right to make their case about why they're voting the way they're voting. He then closes that with affirming their common Christian identity. He does…

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